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Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
war, which is iraq, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. this is the battle the united states is facing. the balance of power in the region, the iran iraqi, the indo-pakistani. each one of them have destabilized over 10 years. in the air of israel relationship, barring some dramatic change in egypt over time, israel is so dominant that it creates new realities on the ground. there's a difference to what the united states really says very often. in afghanistan the united states is asking pakistan to do things that create stability, that will weaken pakistan, that potentially cratered an independent regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the
a quarter of its stationed troops in afghanistan by the end of next year. sarkozy announced the pullout as a news conference with afghan president karzai in kabul on tuesday. >> translator: afghanistan is no longer in danger of being taken over by the afghanisn. the time is now to start the drawdown of troops. >> sarkozy says the drawdown about end by 2012. sarko sarkozy's move comes as other countries are withdrawing troops from afghanistan. the united states plans to bring home about a third of its armed forces by september next year, starting this month. sarkozy is facing increasing calls at home to withdraw troops from afghanistan. next year's presidential election seems to be a key factor to reduce the french military presence. >>> france is calling for the u.n. security council to dump the resolution condemning syrian president bashar al assad for attacking the french embassy in damascus. the attack left three french workers injured. supporters of assad stormed the french and u.s. embassies on monday. rioters damaged the french ambassador's car and broke embassy windows. the frenc
karzai's brother rocking the world of afghanistan. joining us now from kabul, nbc's atia aboui. how did this happen in the fist place? we're getting new details, i know, about how exactly he was assassinated. >> good morning, willie. also referred to as awk was the younger half brother of president hamid karzai. he was shot and killed in his home yesterday in kandahar. a trusted security guard and confidant went into the home using that trust, lured awk out of a meeting, sent him into another room where they were alone the sign papers. as awk was signing those papers, that's when mohammed shot him. it's unclear if he shot hit twice in the head or three times in various parts of his body. right now what's confusing everyone is where did mohammed shoot karzai? what we understand is they're from the same klan, that they're, in fact, distant relatives. the taliban claimed responsibility saying they've worked with sadar mohammed for some time now. but many believe it could be because of a tribal feud which confuses everyone when it comes to afghanistan, because we have to remember there's mo
the morning off. >> we've got a lot of news this morning, including some breaking news out of afghanistan. >> that's right. we begin there where afghan president hamid karzai's half brother was found shot to death at his home. ahmed wali karzai was the provenÇal council chief of kandahar. he suffered gunshot wounds to his head and chest according to hospital officials. a spokesman for kandahar's government said a guard killed karzai. the taliban says -- >> we've seen the worst so far. excessive heat warnings and advisories posted in 23 states. the heat in many areas could reach 115 degrees. the heat wave is being blamed for one death in madison county, illinois. in oklahoma it was so hot, that part of a highway buckled. look at that. motorist was hospitalized after his bike hit the buckled pavement. in arkansas several communities have opened cooling centers. good rule of thumb in tis heat whatever you're doing don't overdo it. >> if you're going to go outside in heat like this better be drinking a lot of water before you come out. make sure you have some substance in your stomach or you
, or afghanistan, or iraq, or not so secret 'secret' war in yemen, somehow can solve this problem; they are making a serious mistake. all the war in the world is only going to exacerbate this hunger crisis. of course what we need is farmers that in a stable environment can plant high yield crops and get the support that they need to earn their livelihoods and help feed their populations. we need a different approach; peace will come through sustainable development; and this is the absolutely the most vitalrealisation that we need to make in the world. >>reporter: still to come on world business... >>from a war torn country on the brink of starvation to stellar success, we look at the rise of vietnam >>and competitive climbing is not hanging around in its quest to attract new fans. >>scaling new heights... and the rest in just a moment on world business... >>25 years ago vietnam started reforms to move the country from a planned economy to a socialist oriented market economy. reforms that have transformed both the country and the lives of its people. >>reporter: every morning for thousands of vietn
the president to wage war. we do so at a time when the united states is so engaged in wars in afghanistan and iraq and our national debt exceeds $14 trillion. in light of these circumstances and the lack of united states vital interests in in libya, i do not believe we should be intervening in a civil war there. american combat forces are so efficient at certain types of operations and are over the horizon technology is so potent that the use of the military instrument to right wrongs exists as a tremendous temptation for presidents. american intervention in libya did not come as a result of a disciplined assessment of our vital interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it
and afghanistan. he is in baghdad this morning where he's meeting with u.s. forces as well as iraqi leaders. he says iraq has to do more to prevent insurge attacks on americans with iranian weapons. >> i would like for iraq to exert more of an effort to go after those extremists that are making use of these weapons, that if you are going, they have a responsibility to protect against that kind of attack occurring. >> all 46,000 remaining american troops are withdrawing this year under an agreement between the two countries. iraqi leaders are debating whether to request u.s. troops stay in the country beyond 2011. >>> this morning, pakistan telling america, keep your money, after the u.s. announced it's withholding $800 million in military aid. this is more evidence of the growing rift between the u.s. and pakistan. white house chief of staff william daly says it's in response to pakistan's decision to cut back on counterterrorism operations after the killing of osama bin laden. the u.s. typically gives pakistan more than $2 billion a year in security assistance. >>> u.s. joint chiefs of staff a
in afghanistan's air force. >> and are training in texas. ed lavandara has more on their history making mission. >> reporter: the passion and dreams of these four women easily cuts through their broken english. >> we are going to open the door for our laid niece afghanistan. it is a big deal for us to open the door. ladies that have dreams but can't do it. we want to show them. >> reporter: these laid reese lieutenants in the afghanistan military and have come to the united states to study english at the defense language institute in texas. it is their dreams of piloting helicopters that could help change the future of women in their homeland. >> these young ladies are path finders, trail blazers. and -- as such, they are subject to the criticism and antagonism of those that don't want to see the particular path. >> reporter: the soldiers say they are prepared for the scrutiny and are confident. >> the women of afghanistan, don't be afraid of anything. if you want to do something, you can do it. just believe in yourself you can do it. >> reporter: back home, these women are battling chauvanism.
country, why? well, they've been active in afghanistan, had a deployment there for several years, active in the libyan air campaign, the cartoon issue. also, what we're finding in scandinavia is groups themselves are coming together from denmark, sweden, and norway, different ethnicities gathering and meeting in mosques, and they are adjacent -- they're local to norway, sweden, denmark. know where the targets are. and saying a man who lived in norway, head of a very radical sunni group from northern iraq who was prosecuted because he'd threatened norwegian ministers because he was going to be deported. he said, you deport me and i get killed in iraq, the same will happen to norwegian ministers. so they do have this fringe in scandinavian countries of islamist militants. >> when i have questions about terrorism here, i often come you and ask you, you know, who these people are, what's going on here. in terms of who might be behind this, who do you think? >> it could be a whole range of groups. but the point is that al qaeda is not so much an organization. it's more a spirit for these peop
. we can't expect america with all its economic and other problems and with afghanistan to pull our chestnuts out of the fire. >> rose: but on the question of nato, secretary gates suggested as much. >> rose: indeed. indeed. witness again, you know, a few weeks of military action on a very small scale in libya... >> rose: and all of a sudden... >> and we're running out of munitions and turning back to the united states as the land of last rest. but look, frankly, the military action in libya which i supported, reluctantly but i supported, i actually a sideshow. the big question is can you turn egypt which had been historically at the heart of islamic culture and scholarship into a model and a beacon for threst of the arab world in. >> rose: and your answer is likely? unlikely? too soon to tell? >> look, i mean, there's amaze pog ten nshl egypt and then a highly educated young people, a strong middle-class, a great sense of history and tradition. but it could all go pear shaped between armyn the one hand which is now proving an unam big rouse friend of liberal democracy and the musli
and afghanistan wars. that is $1 trillion of difference. the boehner plan doesn't consider the winding down of the afghanistan and iraq wars. another thing that is in there that is very different from the democrat and republican ideas is boehner has this balanced budget amendment in there. it is a requirement for both houses to pass it. the democrats say that is ridiculous. the fact of the matter is, a lot of people out there in the country think it is a good idea until they start having to worry about entitlements being cut as a result of it. that is something that the democrats and republicans disagree on. probably the biggest thing is the idea of the two-step process that boehner has. the republicans, i should say the democrats don't like that at all. they have to work that one out. >> joe johns, you are up and at it for us. we have reporters on capitol hill who are checking in with you in d.c. another interesting day. joe, thank you so much. the president has lost some 30,000 supporters in the midst of all of this. the president has urged a compromi compromise. he did it on twitter. he
be in afghanistan and? >> that's what i said, i think this is a debate that we can actually have because i think you can make and argue for it. at the same time, i -- it is a kind of academic question. i just don't think it's going to happen. >> your great grandfather would say we have to have these academic questions. don't go playing fdr on me. >> a damn sight better,úg c something. yeah, you know, i think that one of the things to remember about these brothers and one the reasons why g i think looking at their stores is really valuable is they were really working out how to answer some of these questions, and there was an urgency because there were new0ñ questions. they felt them. and these are questions that we just don't feel. you know, the kind of tension between your responsibilities as individuals, your responsibilit as a citizen, ethics versus morality. these all sound academic terms, but when he came down to it it's like are you going to die for your country? are you going to -- choose a@ side in such a way that it's not unequal, not as unjust. we had huge structural problems in this c
at military bases worldwide from iraq to afghanistan to guantanamo bay. most often, he travels with his group, which you have heard about. the cookies on the table are a tribute to that. they are the focus of a feature-length documentary that chronicles the band travels to entertain the troops. they have a website. they are doing a launch very soon where people can watch that. kfar the proceeds will benefit the gary sinise foundation. while dismissing the speculation that he is running for political office -- [laughter] but we might follow up on that today. our guest has been an outspoken critic of bureaucracy and red tape that often delays and prevents service members and veterans from getting care and benefits. he has said the nation is not doing enough to help disabled veterans and u.s. troops wounded in iraq and afghanistan. he has called on the government to -- and the private sector to spend more on victims of posttraumatic stress disorder and get them some help. he is a star who moonlights as a soldier's advocate. our speaker has questioned his own industry at times while producing fil
're at war for 10 years, in afghanistan and iraq at surge levels. we assume we're going to be fighting this war for 10 more years, with over 100,000 troops in afghanistan and oh, gosh, wait, we're going to withdraw our troops in 2014. $1 trillion in savings. i've got a better idea. let's pass a bill to cover the moon with yogurt that will cost $5 trillion today. and then let's pass a bill the next day to cancel that bill. we could save $5 trillion. wait, i've got a better idea. our debt is $14 trillion. let's come up with a new plan to spend $14 trillion, then rescind it the next day and let's save $14 trillion. this stuff is fiscal fantasy. you can't make this stuff up, mr. speaker. suggesting that we're going to be in a war at these levels for 10 more years when everybody knows we've already decided not to do that, that does not get us $1.3 trillion in spending cuts. only in washington can you add up math like that. we need real spending cuts. i yield myself an additional minute to say, this is getting serious, mr. speaker. very serious. we can't keep spending money we just don't hav
wars, one in iraq and one in afghanistan and keep in mind, this, of course, was post-9/11. nothing, though, compares to the bush tax cuts have had on the federal budget. how does this compare to barack obama? well, we're looking at projected spending here from 2009 all the way to 2017. there is president obama's health care package, obama care, $152 billion there. discretion nair extendy tear, stimulus tax cuts, just over $425 billion and barack obama had his own stimulus package, just over $700 billion. let's look at the two grand totals here. president bush, a grand total of over $5 billion, president obama about $1.5 trillion. what this says is, yes, both presidents spent a lot of money over a long period of time but this crisis has been years in the making. >> that's one of the criticisms that many on washington have been receiving. we saw this coming. >> now it's time for a spot of weather and it's not looking like a great weekend for us in asia. in fact, if winds were howling around our building. i believe it has a lot do with the tropical storm system that's passing by here
the war's we have got accustomed to with vietnam, iraq, afghanistan is they are fraught mostly and there are very few among fed dead and wounded who were sensa and daughters of ceos, senators, members of congress or anything like that. it was the exact opposite and avert -- first world war the death toll fell proportionally higher on the upper class. the main reason for that was it was customary four sons of the upper class and aristocracy to have military careers. one major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries but to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a tumultuous time in europe so was yearly 20th century and european armies were used to break strikes with the british army put down rebellions in ireland and so therefore the officer was generally reserved for those of the upper class is meeting when the country's went to war in 1914 come in the upper class is suffer the enormous toll. for example,, for the 30 graduates of the 10 killed in a single day, the first day of the battle in 1916 come the men who graduated fro
for afghanistan's female voice, two for the last draftee retires, or three for the history of cocaine. winning story will air in the next hour. >>> well, the east is finally getting some relief from the heat this week. rob joins us with what is on the way. >> cooler temperatures at least for a couple days, suzanne. then i think we'll crank things back up. i want to put into perspective last week as far as the amount of heat for the week of july 17-24th. we had on friday the hottest day of the week, 745 temperature records, total records for the entire week, almost 4,000, unbelievable. guess what? we had more records yesterday. 100 degrees in raleigh. 100 degrees in atlantic city. wilmington, north carolina also seeing the century mark and pennsylvania and philadelphia seeing 98 degrees there so where are we going to see the hot weather today? across the southern plains of the central plains, dallas and oklahoma city, and parts of arkansas have seen 100 degrees plus now for over 20 days in a row. and the next five to ten days doesn't look to be any cooler. i think we'll probably see a record st
, mullah omar was dead. we're following the story. we go live to kabul, afghanistan. david, this one has got people wondering. what's going on? >> reporter: well, the news first broke by an afghan television station and then later in the day, cnn and other media received a message by an individual claiming to be a top taliban commander. that individual said that mullah omar had died of heart failure last week and a successor had already been named. the taliban, like you said, later came out and said they have been the victim of a hacking and their phones and emails have been tapped. in fact this message was phoney. cnn doesn't have any confirmation of the sort. we spoke with nato official and they have no operational knowledge on the ground. so the whereabouts of mullah omar are unknown. last believed to be in pakistan, where taliban militants have launched attacks across that border against troops down in the southern region. it's those southern and eastern regions of afghanistan that have experienced some of the highest levels of attacks. and this all comes at a very interesting time.
to continue going into another country's civil war when we have such commitments in afghanistan and iraq. when we are overdeploying our troops, when we are spending money that we are having to borrow, when we are taking the lion's share of this responsibility for our allies. many of us think that we shouldn't be adding another country where it's supposed to be a support function, but we all know that that is what leads to something more and then something more, and i thought senator lugar said it very well; then you have the aftermath of the end of a civil war and the responsibilities for that so this is not the time, in my opinion, to be giving that kind of authority to the president, but above that, above that, we are here because there is a crisis pop which i think -- upon which i think we have a united view of the goal, and that is to put our fiscal house in order so we're not united in the united states senate about how to do it so let's have that debate this week. let's have that debate that says we should be spending more or we should be spending less, that we should be taxing more or t
. not only as we wind down the two wars in afghanistan and iraq, i think as a general principle, we have to have a much more what i would call in mechanical factor on our resources, regardless of which branch of the service we are talking about. keep the military strong, make sure we are protecting our veterans, which we have not done a very good job at. i don't think we need the amount of money we're spending now for every military -- every apparatus we can think of. i don't think we can continue down that trail any longer. we cannot afford it and we don't need it. host: congressman bill pascrell is with us for another 15 minutes. republican -- helen, republican line. guest: good morning, helen. caller: i used to be a substitute teacher. the school i had had supplies. it was blessed. but the administration in our county is bloated, its bloated. because i was a substitute teacher, i listened. there is so much administrative and bureaucratic money wasted on education. but you holler, oh, the poor children and teachers, which is correct, but so much money is wasted in bureaucracy -- wasted
on the plan to withdraw 30,000 troops from afghanistan by september, 2012. and after that, dan iannicola of the financial literacy group talks about financial service providers. plus your emails, phone calls and tweets. washington journal, live saturday at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> tune in to c-span this independence day. writer misme lind and other panelists discuss if the united states can remain ninalted. >> at the political level, we're more divided. if you look at partisan polarization than at any point since the civil war in reconstruction. >> then the dalai lama and sister helen prajean talk about religion, violence and the death penalty and nixon white house insiders discuss his presidency's foreign policy. this monday, july 4, beginning at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. for the complete schedule of programs and times go to c-span.org. this fourth of july three-day weekend on american history tv on c-span three. we'll visit the smithsonian museum of natural history to learn about a 19th century u.s. government expedition to circumnavigate the globe and their treasure, 4
-- vietnam, iraq, afghanistan -- is that they are fought mostly by the poor. there are very, very few among the dead and wounded in the those three wars who have been sons or daughters of ceos, senators, members of congress, anything like that. it was the exact opposite in the first world war. the death toll actually fell proportionately higher on the upper classes. and the main reason for that was that it was customary for sons of the upper classes, sons of the air strock rah si to have military careers. and i think a major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries, they're there to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a very tumultuous time in europe, so was the early 20th century. many of the european armies were used to break strikes or the british army, you know, put down tenant farmer rebellions in ireland. and so, therefore, officering the army was something that was generally reserved for people in the upper classes. this meant that when these countries went to war in 1914, these upper classes suffered an enormous toll. for examp
in afghanistan. he mosted a video asks mila kunis to go to the marine ball with him. first she said yes and then took it back. mila has a scheduling conflict. she will be filming two movies in november and can't go. but she says she will still hang with him another time. >> do you think that's better or worse, hang with him another time, go to a movie or something like that. you don't think this is happening. you think she is not. why do you think she's not? >> i think that she probably doesn't feel comfortable going on a date with this guy she never met before. and she seemed a little pressured into it by her co-star, justin timberlake. >> now let's see what j.t. says. another marine corps post ad video asking justin timberlake to be her date to the event. she even had a facebook page for it. here is her proposal. >> so, justin, you want to call out my girl mila? i'm going to call you out and ask you to come to the marine corps ball with me in washington, d.c. if you can't go all i have to say is cry me a river. >> that was good. now justin timberlake is in a tough spot. he kept nudgin
includes the era of president george bush. and the wars of iraq an afghanistan. congress last came together and raised the debt ceiling in february of 2010. and it dizz so -- it did so with the idea that we were working together. we understand that we're at a $14-plus trillion. there's no one who is happy with a growing debt. but many economists will tell you that economists will tell you that a deficit is sometimes important to take care of a country's people. who knows what is going on in japan right now because they need to take care of their people. they need to ensure that those who are impacted by the sunesune and earthquake and knew -- by the tsunami and the earthquake and the nuclear explosion, they need to take care of the sick people and the hurt people. but our country is not like portugal and greece. economists -- an economist we listened to two weeks ago said on the record that this country is -- that this nation is not broke. let me say it again, americans. don't be intimidated and frightened to believe that america is broke. we can solve this problem. the way in which we are
about president obama's plan to reduce troop numbers in afghanistan, and the security of the country, and the president and ceo financial literacy group discusses a recent poll that shows high school student strongly distressed financial service providers. that is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> he had decided several days before mcanally arrived that he was going to kill him. he went out and bought a pistol, followed his whereabouts in the newspapers, reported in detail, and he began tracking him. >> on september 6, 1901, an anarchist fired two fatal shots at president william mckinley. sunday, scott miller looks at the president and his assassin and
decade. a big piece is what senator reid calls the winding down of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. that will save $1 trillion. republicans have called that a gimmick, savings from wars that are winding down, even though by the way, the same savings were counted in some republican budgets. reid's plan would not reform or cut medicare, medicaid, social security. there would be no changes to taxes. it would raise the debt ceiling by $2.4 trillion. that would be enough to fund the government through next year's election. now the boehner plan is more short term. it would raise the debt ceiling in two different steps. the first step would happen immediately. raising that ceiling by about a trillion dollars, would be accompanied by spending cuts of $1.2 trillion over ten years. that would get us to next year. right? when we would need a second vote to raise the debt ceiling again by another $1.6 trillion. now that second increase would be contingent on more cuts, another 1.8 there the in spending cuts that would have to be agreed to by a bipartisan committee. the second vote you guys, is
blocks, we all have in common and you look around these clips from afghanistan to iraq to california to copenhagen, wherever it is, and you see actually everybody is frightened of death, everybody loves their children, you know, so that sense of unity is very reassuring i find, many optimistic. i'm a pessimistic european. normally i think life miserable but this made me think life is pretty great actually. >> i hate movie critics. nobody ever writes about a movie why i would want to see it. if i'm telling my buddies why they should see this movie, what's the pitch is this. >> it is a time capsule of a moment on earth and it's made into a movie, almost 4,500 hours, made into a movie. it's a series of youtube clips. well, it's actually made to feel like it's 95 minutes long and you go on a journey, you start at midnight on one day and end at midnight on the next and you experience the world in that day and you laugh and you relate to characters and i think you cry a bit. i had a screen last night at the museum of modern art, people were in floods of tears, but they also feel uplifted b
voting, for example, on the war in afghanistan, they are committing the united states of america to spending spending $10 billion a month in defense of our men and women in uniform, members of our family who are over there waging this war. they voted for that. now president obama has said to them the bill's coming in for the war in afghanistan, i have to borrow money to pay for it. and these same members of congress, house and senate, who voted for the war in afghanistan are now saying we won't pay the bills, we won't extend the debt ceiling, we won't allow you, mr. president, to borrow the money to sustain our military forces in afghanistan. that is literally what we're talking about here in this debate. the american people are starting to come to understand it because when you first ask a person do you want to extend the debt ceiling, the obvious answer is no, are you crazy, senator? why would i want more debt in this country? we need less debt, not more. don't you get it? understandably, that's the public reaction, but when you go to the point of explaining that this is to pay
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)